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Lurker

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Lurker last won the day on September 26

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About Lurker

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    Associate Professor
  • Birthday 02/13/1983

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    INDONESIA
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    GIS and Remote Sensing

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  1. The quality and cost of broadband remain issues for households across the US, and the Biden administration wants to draw attention to that unfortunate reality. The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) has published what it says is the first interactive public map detailing the "digital divide" in broadband access. You'll not only see areas where broadband speeds fall below official targets (25Mbps down and 3Mbps up), but correlate that with high-poverty areas. You can look for specific locations, including Tribal lands and minority-serving institutions. As
  2. When humans pump large volumes of fluid into the ground, they can set off potentially damaging earthquakes, depending on the underlying geology. This has been the case in certain oil- and gas-producing regions, where wastewater, often mixed with oil, is disposed of by injecting it back into the ground—a process that has triggered sizable seismic events in recent years. Now MIT researchers, working with an interdisciplinary team of scientists from industry and academia, have developed a method to manage such human-induced seismicity, and have demonstrated that the technique successfully re
  3. On February 7, 2017, the twentieth and final inclination (Delta-I) maneuver of Landsat 7 took place. (Delta-I maneuvers keep the spacecraft in the correct orbital position to ensure it maintains its 10:00 am ± 15 minutes mean local time (MLT) equatorial crossing.) Landsat 7 reached its peak outermost inclination boundary of 10:14:58 MLT on August 11, 2017. Landsat 7 is now drifting in its inclination and will fall back to 09:15 am MLT by July 2021. The chart below illustrates the inclination trend from June 2014 to June 2026. The USGS and NASA are planning
  4. Many of Africa’s agricultural endeavors have long been tied to whims of the weather. When it rains, a country’s gross domestic product might soar. When it doesn’t rain, economies suffer. The reliance has been driven in part by the perception that dry, arid Africa has limited water resources. But a new study, years in the making, shows a different reality. As one South African scientist recently noted, if all the rainfall stopped today and for the next 100 years in Africa, there would still be plenty of water stored underneath the continent’s surface, it just wouldn’t be evenly distributed
  5. Classification of precipitation change regimes based on changes in the precipitation mean state and variability. Shading indicates the ratio of change in precipitation variability and mean precipitation. Climate models predict that rainfall variability over wet regions globally will be greatly enhanced by global warming, causing wide swings between dry and wet conditions, according to a joint study by the Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and the Met Office, the UK's national meteorological service. This study was published
  6. Scientists from Cambridge University and NTU Singapore have found that slow-motion collisions of tectonic plates drag more carbon into Earth's interior than previously thought. They found that the carbon drawn into Earth's interior at subduction zones—where tectonic plates collide and dive into Earth's interior—tends to stay locked away at depth, rather than resurfacing in the form of volcanic emissions. Their findings, published in Nature Communications, suggest that only about a third of the carbon recycled beneath volcanic chains returns to the surface via recycling, in contrast t
  7. Honeywell has unveiled a new rate sensor to help small satellites navigate increasingly crowded orbits above the Earth’s surface. The new micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS)-based product provides low cost and power consumption in a smaller size than previous Honeywell offerings, while maintaining high performance levels. It is suitable for customers building smaller and lower-cost satellites, according to Honeywell. Honeywell’s HG4934 space rate sensor is roughly the same size and weight (145 grams) as a baseball. Compared to Honeywell’s previous rate sensors, it consumes only one-fif
  8. The United Nations on Thursday recognised a new record high temperature for the Antarctic continent, confirming a reading of 18.3 degrees Celsius (64.9 degrees Fahrenheit) made last year. The record heat was reached at Argentina's Esperanza research station on the Antarctic Peninsula on February 6, 2020, the UN's World Meteorological Organization said. "Verification of this maximum temperature record is important because it helps us to build up a picture of the weather and climate in one of Earth's final frontiers," said WMO secretary-general Petteri Taalas. "The Antarctic Penin
  9. A global land cover GeoTIFF was recently released by Impact Observatory (IO) and Esri. To create this geospatial layer, hundreds of thousands of satellite photos were classified into ten unique land use/land cover (LULC) classes using a deep learning model in partnership with Microsoft AI for Earth. Sentinel-2 imagery was used to divide the world into ten categories of land use cover: Water (areas that are predominately water such as rivers ponds, lakes, and ocean) Trees (clusters that are at least 10 meters high) Grasslands such as open savannas, parks, and golf courses
  10. only found portable version https://nsaneforums.com/topic/400520-portable-paf-reclaime-pro-build-2522/?tab=comments#comment-1662932
  11. Geologic activity on Earth appears to follow a 27.5-million-year cycle, giving the planet a 'pulse,' according to a new study published in the journal Geoscience Frontiers. "Many geologists believe that geological events are random over time. But our study provides statistical evidence for a common cycle, suggesting that these geologic events are correlated and not random," said Michael Rampino, a geologist and professor in New York University's Department of Biology, as well as the study's lead author. Over the past five decades, researchers have proposed cycles of major geological
  12. On December 9, 2019, a cloud of steam and volcanic gases blasted out of New Zealand’s Whakaari, or White Island, volcano. Relative to eruptions at other volcanoes, the explosion was small. But it claimed the lives of 22 people and injured another 25, many of whom suffered severe burns. Now, using high-resolution satellite data and computer algorithms, scientists have revealed how gases released by the volcano subtly changed before, during and after the 2019 eruption. Observing such small changes using satellites could greatly improve volcano monitoring and help spot early warnings o
  13. A flip-flop of Earth’s magnetic poles between 42,000 and 41,000 years ago briefly but dramatically shrank the magnetic field’s strength — and may have triggered a cascade of environmental crises on Earth, a new study suggests. With the help of new, precise carbon dating obtained from ancient tree fossils, the researchers correlated shifts in climate patterns, large mammal extinctions and even changes in human behavior just before and during the Laschamps excursion, a brief reversal of the magnetic poles that lasted less than a thousand years. It’s the first study to directly link a magnet
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