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    NASA Advanced Rapid Imaging Satellite Maps Blast Damage: Beirut Explosion Aftermath

    Lurker
    By Lurker,
    NASA’s ARIA team, in collaboration with the Earth Observatory of Singapore, used satellite data to map the extent of likely damage following a massive explosion in Beirut. Dark red pixels represent the most severe damage. Areas in orange are moderately damaged, and areas in yellow are likely to have sustained somewhat less damage. Each colored pixel represents an area of 30 meters (33 yards). The map contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data processed by ESA (European Space Agency) and analyzed

    China launches new optical remote-sensing satellite

    Lurker
    By Lurker,
    A Long March-2D carrier rocket, carrying the Gaofen-9 04 satellite, is launched from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China, Aug. 6, 2020. China successfully launched a new optical remote-sensing satellite from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center at 12:01 p.m. Thursday (Beijing Time). (Photo by Wang Jiangbo/Xinhua) JIUQUAN, Aug. 6 (Xinhua) -- China successfully launched a new optical remote-sensing satellite from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China at 12:0

    3D simulation

    iron1maiden
    By iron1maiden,
    The video shows a landslide analysis of Tersun Dam simulated with FLOW-3D. For more examples of how FLOW-3D can be used to analyze the catastrophic events. A fully 3D simulation was performed in the vicinity of the breach to capture the complex 3D hydraulic conditions. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=3&v=f9QzOn0vxpc&feature=emb_title          

    Canadian ice caps disappear, confirming 2017 scientific prediction

    Lurker
    By Lurker,
    The St. Patrick Bay ice caps on the Hazen Plateau of northeastern Ellesmere Island in Nunavut, Canada, have disappeared, according to NASA satellite imagery. National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) scientists and colleagues predicted via a 2017 paper in The Cryosphere that the ice caps would melt out completely within the next five years, and recent images from NASA's Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) have confirmed that this prediction was accurate. M

    Latest satellite images show situation far from normal at Ladakh's Pangong Tso

    Lurker
    By Lurker,
    Despite the controversy related to China-India border, this articles show us the importance of Remote Sensing as a strategic tools on Politic and Military      The recent deaths of at least 20 soldiers along the contested border at Ladakh between India and China represents the largest loss of life from a skirmish between the two countries since the clashes in 1967 that left hundreds dead. It also highlights the tensions that have been building along the Line of Actual

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    • After following all the steps Thoroughly, I am not able to open it in registered version of GPSMapEdit. I got the following message ..... Loading data from file 'F:\D\GIS_Works\GPS\Test\Extract\27338226-nonNT.img'... * Block size:    4096 * Updated:    2020/08 *** Loading sub-map: 'I1A125F2'... * Defined:     NET * Defined:     NOD * Generated:    T * Sorting:       UTF8 WARNING: Unexpected format of input data. Text coding 11-bit per symbol is not supported. WARNING: MAPSOURC.MPS - (Not a map, just special Garmin data) ERROR: Loading has terminated. 2 warning(s). Load time is 0.03 s. Please guide me.. where I am missing finally  
    • NASA’s ARIA team, in collaboration with the Earth Observatory of Singapore, used satellite data to map the extent of likely damage following a massive explosion in Beirut. Dark red pixels represent the most severe damage. Areas in orange are moderately damaged, and areas in yellow are likely to have sustained somewhat less damage. Each colored pixel represents an area of 30 meters (33 yards). The map contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data processed by ESA (European Space Agency) and analyzed by ARIA team scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech, and Earth Observatory of Singapore. Based in Pasadena, California, Caltech manages JPL for NASA. Scientists are using satellite data to map ground surface changes in the aftermath of the recent explosion. NASA’s Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team, in collaboration with the Earth Observatory of Singapore, used satellite-derived synthetic aperture radar data to map the likely extent of damage from a massive August 4 explosion in Beirut. Synthetic aperture radar data from space shows ground surface changes from before and after a major event like an earthquake. In this case, it is being used to show the devastating result of an explosion. On the map, dark red pixels — like those present at and around the Port of Beirut — represent the most severe damage. Areas in orange are moderately damaged and areas in yellow are likely to have sustained somewhat less damage. Each colored pixel represents an area of 30 meters (33 yards). Maps like this one can help identify badly damaged areas where people may need assistance. The explosion occurred near the city’s port. It claimed more than 150 lives and is estimated to have caused billions of dollars’ worth of damage. The map contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data processed by ESA (European Space Agency) and analyzed by ARIA team scientists at NASA JPL, Caltech, and Earth Observatory of Singapore. Located in Pasadena, California, Caltech manages JPL for NASA.   source: https://scitechdaily.com/nasa-advanced-rapid-imaging-satellite-maps-blast-damage-beirut-explosion-aftermath/
    • A Long March-2D carrier rocket, carrying the Gaofen-9 04 satellite, is launched from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China, Aug. 6, 2020. China successfully launched a new optical remote-sensing satellite from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center at 12:01 p.m. Thursday (Beijing Time). (Photo by Wang Jiangbo/Xinhua) JIUQUAN, Aug. 6 (Xinhua) -- China successfully launched a new optical remote-sensing satellite from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China at 12:01 p.m. Thursday (Beijing Time). The satellite, Gaofen-9 04, was sent into orbit by a Long March-2D carrier rocket. It has a resolution up to the sub-meter level. The satellite will be mainly used for land surveys, city planning, land right confirmation, road network design, crop yield estimation and disaster prevention and mitigation. It will also provide information for the development of the Belt and Road Initiative. The same carrier rocket also sent the Gravity & Atmosphere Scientific Satellite (Q-SAT) into space. The Q-SAT satellite, developed by Tsinghua University, will help with the satellite system design approach and orbital atmospheric density measurement, among others. Thursday's launch was the 342nd mission of the Long March rocket series.   source: http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2020-08/06/c_139269788.htm
    • The video shows a landslide analysis of Tersun Dam simulated with FLOW-3D. For more examples of how FLOW-3D can be used to analyze the catastrophic events. A fully 3D simulation was performed in the vicinity of the breach to capture the complex 3D hydraulic conditions. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=3&v=f9QzOn0vxpc&feature=emb_title          
    • The St. Patrick Bay ice caps on the Hazen Plateau of northeastern Ellesmere Island in Nunavut, Canada, have disappeared, according to NASA satellite imagery. National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) scientists and colleagues predicted via a 2017 paper in The Cryosphere that the ice caps would melt out completely within the next five years, and recent images from NASA's Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) have confirmed that this prediction was accurate. Mark Serreze, director of NSIDC, Distinguished Professor of Geography at the University of Colorado Boulder, and lead author on the paper, first set foot on the St. Patrick Bay ice caps in 1982 as a young graduate student. He visited the ice caps with his advisor, Ray Bradley, of the University of Massachusetts. "When I first visited those ice caps, they seemed like such a permanent fixture of the landscape," said Serreze. "To watch them die in less than 40 years just blows me away." In 2017, scientists compared ASTER satellite data from July 2015 to vertical aerial photographs taken in August of 1959. They found that between 1959 and 2015, the ice caps had been reduced to only five percent of their former area, and shrank noticeably between 2014 and 2015 in response to the especially warm summer in 2015. The ice caps are absent from ASTER images taken on July 14, 2020. The St. Patrick Bay ice caps were one-half of a group of small ice caps on the Hazen Plateau, which formed and likely attained their maximum extents during the Little Ice Age, perhaps several centuries ago. The Murray and Simmons ice caps, which make up the second half of the Hazen Plateau ice caps, are located at a higher elevation and are therefore faring better, though scientists predict that their demise is imminent as well.   "We've long known that as climate change takes hold, the effects would be especially pronounced in the Arctic," said Serreze. "But the death of those two little caps that I once knew so well has made climate change very personal. All that's left are some photographs and a lot of memories." source: https://phys.org/news/2020-07-canadian-ice-caps-scientific.html
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