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Showing content with the highest reputation since 08/05/2020 in Posts

  1. 1 point
    NASA’s ARIA team, in collaboration with the Earth Observatory of Singapore, used satellite data to map the extent of likely damage following a massive explosion in Beirut. Dark red pixels represent the most severe damage. Areas in orange are moderately damaged, and areas in yellow are likely to have sustained somewhat less damage. Each colored pixel represents an area of 30 meters (33 yards). The map contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data processed by ESA (European Space Agency) and analyzed by ARIA team scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech, and Earth Observatory of Singapore. Based in Pasadena, California, Caltech manages JPL for NASA. Scientists are using satellite data to map ground surface changes in the aftermath of the recent explosion. NASA’s Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team, in collaboration with the Earth Observatory of Singapore, used satellite-derived synthetic aperture radar data to map the likely extent of damage from a massive August 4 explosion in Beirut. Synthetic aperture radar data from space shows ground surface changes from before and after a major event like an earthquake. In this case, it is being used to show the devastating result of an explosion. On the map, dark red pixels — like those present at and around the Port of Beirut — represent the most severe damage. Areas in orange are moderately damaged and areas in yellow are likely to have sustained somewhat less damage. Each colored pixel represents an area of 30 meters (33 yards). Maps like this one can help identify badly damaged areas where people may need assistance. The explosion occurred near the city’s port. It claimed more than 150 lives and is estimated to have caused billions of dollars’ worth of damage. The map contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data processed by ESA (European Space Agency) and analyzed by ARIA team scientists at NASA JPL, Caltech, and Earth Observatory of Singapore. Located in Pasadena, California, Caltech manages JPL for NASA. source: https://scitechdaily.com/nasa-advanced-rapid-imaging-satellite-maps-blast-damage-beirut-explosion-aftermath/
  2. 1 point
    A Long March-2D carrier rocket, carrying the Gaofen-9 04 satellite, is launched from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China, Aug. 6, 2020. China successfully launched a new optical remote-sensing satellite from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center at 12:01 p.m. Thursday (Beijing Time). (Photo by Wang Jiangbo/Xinhua) JIUQUAN, Aug. 6 (Xinhua) -- China successfully launched a new optical remote-sensing satellite from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China at 12:01 p.m. Thursday (Beijing Time). The satellite, Gaofen-9 04, was sent into orbit by a Long March-2D carrier rocket. It has a resolution up to the sub-meter level. The satellite will be mainly used for land surveys, city planning, land right confirmation, road network design, crop yield estimation and disaster prevention and mitigation. It will also provide information for the development of the Belt and Road Initiative. The same carrier rocket also sent the Gravity & Atmosphere Scientific Satellite (Q-SAT) into space. The Q-SAT satellite, developed by Tsinghua University, will help with the satellite system design approach and orbital atmospheric density measurement, among others. Thursday's launch was the 342nd mission of the Long March rocket series. source: http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2020-08/06/c_139269788.htm
  3. 1 point
    The video shows a landslide analysis of Tersun Dam simulated with FLOW-3D. For more examples of how FLOW-3D can be used to analyze the catastrophic events. A fully 3D simulation was performed in the vicinity of the breach to capture the complex 3D hydraulic conditions. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=3&v=f9QzOn0vxpc&feature=emb_title


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