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  1. 2 points
    Scientists have discovered new evidence for active volcanism next door to some of the most densely populated areas of Europe. The study crowdsourced GPS monitoring data from antennae across western Europe to track subtle movements in the Earth’s surface, thought to be caused by a rising subsurface mantle plume. The Eifel region lies roughly between the cities of Aachen, Trier and Koblenz, in west-central Germany. It is home to many ancient volcanic features, including the circular lakes known as maars. Maars are the remnants of violent volcanic eruptions, such as the one that created Laacher See, the largest lake in the area. The explosion that created the lake is thought to have occurred around 13,000 years ago. The mantle plume that fed this ancient activity is thought to still be present, extending up to 400 kilometers (km) into the earth. However, whether or not it is still active is unknown. “Most scientists had assumed that volcanic activity in the Eifel was a thing of the past,” said Corné Kreemer, lead author of the new study. “But connecting the dots, it seems clear that something is brewing underneath the heart of northwest Europe.” In the new study, the team — based at the University of Nevada, Reno and the University of California, Los Angeles — used data from thousands of commercial and state-owned GPS stations all over western Europe. The research revealed that the region’s land surface is moving upward and outward over a large area centered on the Eifel, and including Luxembourg, eastern Belgium and the southernmost province of the Netherlands, Limburg. “The Eifel area is the only region in the study where the ground motion appeared significantly greater than expected,” said Kreemer. “The results indicate that a rising plume could explain the observed patterns and rate of ground movement.” The new results complement those of a previous study in Geophysical Journal International that found seismic evidence of magma moving underneath the Laacher See. Both studies point towards the Eifel being an active volcanic system. The implication of this study is that there may not only be an increased volcanic risk, but also a long-term seismic risk in this part of Europe. The researchers urge caution, however. “This does not mean that an explosion or earthquake is imminent, or even possible again in this area. We and other scientists plan to continue monitoring the area using a variety of geophysical and geochemical techniques, to better understand and quantify any potential risks.” source: https://doi.org/10.1093/gji/ggaa227
  2. 1 point
    The video shows a landslide analysis of Tersun Dam simulated with FLOW-3D. For more examples of how FLOW-3D can be used to analyze the catastrophic events. A fully 3D simulation was performed in the vicinity of the breach to capture the complex 3D hydraulic conditions. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=3&v=f9QzOn0vxpc&feature=emb_title
  3. 1 point
    The St. Patrick Bay ice caps on the Hazen Plateau of northeastern Ellesmere Island in Nunavut, Canada, have disappeared, according to NASA satellite imagery. National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) scientists and colleagues predicted via a 2017 paper in The Cryosphere that the ice caps would melt out completely within the next five years, and recent images from NASA's Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) have confirmed that this prediction was accurate. Mark Serreze, director of NSIDC, Distinguished Professor of Geography at the University of Colorado Boulder, and lead author on the paper, first set foot on the St. Patrick Bay ice caps in 1982 as a young graduate student. He visited the ice caps with his advisor, Ray Bradley, of the University of Massachusetts. "When I first visited those ice caps, they seemed like such a permanent fixture of the landscape," said Serreze. "To watch them die in less than 40 years just blows me away." In 2017, scientists compared ASTER satellite data from July 2015 to vertical aerial photographs taken in August of 1959. They found that between 1959 and 2015, the ice caps had been reduced to only five percent of their former area, and shrank noticeably between 2014 and 2015 in response to the especially warm summer in 2015. The ice caps are absent from ASTER images taken on July 14, 2020. The St. Patrick Bay ice caps were one-half of a group of small ice caps on the Hazen Plateau, which formed and likely attained their maximum extents during the Little Ice Age, perhaps several centuries ago. The Murray and Simmons ice caps, which make up the second half of the Hazen Plateau ice caps, are located at a higher elevation and are therefore faring better, though scientists predict that their demise is imminent as well. "We've long known that as climate change takes hold, the effects would be especially pronounced in the Arctic," said Serreze. "But the death of those two little caps that I once knew so well has made climate change very personal. All that's left are some photographs and a lot of memories." source: https://phys.org/news/2020-07-canadian-ice-caps-scientific.html
  4. 1 point
    Despite the controversy related to China-India border, this articles show us the importance of Remote Sensing as a strategic tools on Politic and Military The recent deaths of at least 20 soldiers along the contested border at Ladakh between India and China represents the largest loss of life from a skirmish between the two countries since the clashes in 1967 that left hundreds dead. It also highlights the tensions that have been building along the Line of Actual Control since early May. Using this satellite imagery, I will try to illustrate the approximate reality on the ground. My analysis disproves some of the more extreme claims that have been made about the incident, such as that thousands of Chinese soldiers have crossed the LAC and encamped in Indian-controlled territory. The satellite pictures also highlight the obvious threats to a peaceful status quo that exist along the western sector of India’s border with China. The analysis includes evidence that strongly suggests People’s Liberation Army forces have been regularly crossing into Indian territory temporarily on routine patrol routes. The details of this week’s clashes are still murky. But based on recent satellite imagery and media reporting, it appears the bulk of casualties were the result of soldiers falling during hand-to-hand fighting along a steep ridgeline that marks the LAC. The small area that is at the heart of this dispute appears to straddle the LAC and likely houses less than 50 Chinese troops. Neither Beijing nor Delhi considers the loosely demarcated line that separates the two countries in Ladakh to be an authoritative border. It approximates areas of territorial control established at the end of the 1962 Sino-Indian War when China withdrew from much of its captured territory on the Himalayan plateau. The border standoff at Ladakh has become a politically charged issue in India. The Indian government has revealed few details about the situation over the past few weeks. Former Indian Army officers, however, have been providing information to journalists and the media have been consistently painting a picture of a substantial conflict, often involving claims of the incursion of 10,000 PLA troops into undisputed Indian territory. The reality is less dramatic, but does represent a significant change to the status quo along the India–China border that threatens to escalate. By analysing satellite imagery from late May and early June it’s possible to make informed judgements about the positions of forces at multiple hotspots. Along the India–China border there are three key areas that produce the majority of tension between the two countries: Arunachal Pradesh; Sikkim and nearby Doklam (the site of a major skirmish in 2017 that saw Indian troops enter Bhutanese territory to prevent the completion of a strategic road being built by China); and Ladakh. The build-up of troops and military positions in recent months has been mostly in the Ladakh sector. Developments have occurred in three strategic areas along the LAC: the Galwan River Valley, where this week’s deadly clashes occurred; Hot Springs, where satellite evidence suggests that Chinese forces have regularly entered Indian territory; and the Pangong Tso. complete story : https://www.aspistrategist.org.au/satellite-images-show-positions-surrounding-deadly-china-india-clash/ https://www.indiatoday.in/india/story/latest-satellite-images-show-situation-far-from-normal-at-ladakh-s-pangong-tso-1706373-2020-07-31
  5. 1 point
    This is without a doubt the most anticipated feature of the year for CarPlay users, as Google Maps can now replace Apple Maps on the multi-view screen. Apple originally locked the maps card on the CarPlay dashboard to Apple Maps, which means that users weren’t allowed to configure any other application to display real-time information in this panel. It goes without saying this was quite an issue for many users, especially as Google Maps and the Google-owned Waze are extremely popular choices among CarPlay users. The release of iOS 13.4 in April brought massive changes in this regard, as the maps card was unlocked for third parties, essentially allowing any developer of such an app to add support for the dashboard and thus be able to replace Apple Maps. Google, however, has never been in a rush to make the whole thing happen, so here we are in early August finally getting support for Google Maps on the dashboard. What you need to know, however, is that the feature is only available for testers who are part of the beta program, but chances are that support for the multi-view screen on CarPlay will be included in one of the next Google Maps updates rolling out this month for production devices. In the meantime, Waze is yet to get this feature, as not even the beta builds of the app come with it. However, I’m guessing it’s all now just a matter of time until Waze is being updated with dashboard support on CarPlay, and I’m expecting Google to make this happen in its traffic navigation app rather sooner than later. On a side note, Google has also released a new Google Maps update for the stable channel on iOS, bringing the app to version 5.49. This one, however, includes only fixes and improvements, so no dashboard support for now on production devices. source: https://www.autoevolution.com/news/google-releases-the-most-anticipated-google-maps-carplay-feature-for-testers-146802.html#
  6. 1 point
    This link contains our analysis of NASADEM vs SRTM across North America. We used 252 million extremely accurate IceSat-2 terrain height benchmarks for the comparison. The analysis also includes AW3D30 and ASTER DEMs for good measure. This link is our second analysis of NASADEM across Australia and New Zealand. NASA also publishes an ellipsoidal height dataset which improves accuracy a wee bit, which can be helpful if you're using bicubic interpolation. It has voids which are easy to correct. Note: its heights are not relative to sea level, and are different than what Google Earth and most other mapping products provide. In short, NASADEM is a little better than SRTM in forests (less bias), short vegetation, wetland and urban areas, and a bit worse in barren areas and open water. NASADEM is even better in Australia, too. Also take a look at AW3D30 v3.1.
  7. 1 point
    here you go, please be more active next time
  8. 1 point
    Flow maps are cartographic visualizations to show the movement of objects, people, or other living things from one location to another. Lines, usually symbolized with an arrow to indicate the direction. Color coding or line width can also then be used to indicate the volume of objects that are moving from one location to another. Airline traffic, animal migration, commuters, and import/exports are all common types of geographic data that are typically shown on a flow map . Ilya Boyandin has developed an easy-to-use online tool called Flowmap.blue that takes location data stored in Google Sheets to visualize interactive flow maps. Built using flowmap.gl, deck.gl, mapbox, d3, blueprint, CARTOColors, Flowmap.blue is a browser-based tool that lets users visualize and animate the movement of geographic data between locations. User can quickly set up their own custom flow maps by copying the template spreadsheet and adding in their own location data. The site also hosts plenty of examples that showcase how flowmap.blue was used to map out commuter trips, bicycle rides and sharing trips, human migration, animal migration patterns, and modeling a sewer system. site: https://flowmap.blue/
  9. 1 point
    The COVID-19 pandemic highlights the importance of GIS and spatial analysis to public health. We have seen a variety of analyses and use of spatial platforms to monitor and assess how to address the viral pandemic. However, what this crisis highlights are the needs and deficiencies in how GIS is used in public health and where GIS and public health will be in the future. Trends in public health and GIS started before the COVID-19 pandemic, although the current crisis may catalyze some change to happen faster. For instance, perhaps the greatest contribution that GIS will likely make in public health is a better optimization of care. We can think of hospitals and health workers as supply, while patients are demand. The COVID-19 crisis has shown imbalances between the two has led to a variety of crises, with some areas having more health workers and medical supplies than patients and other regions having vast demand for care and inadequate provisioning. Hospitals and healthcare providers will likely need to increasingly use online and real-time GIS monitoring of communities that forecast spatial change in how communicable diseases may spread.[1] Forecasting that looks at infection rates, analyzes vulnerable populations in an area, and then provides a probability of spread of an infection could provide a way for care workers to anticipate where health needs are likely to be. Such tools are, of course, available now, although data perhaps might be limited to make very accurate predictions. For instance, the National Health Service (NHS) in the UK has applied a tool, HealthGIS, to provide forecasting capabilities of healthcare needs. This tool can provide forecasting capabilities but the speed of data capture may need to improve to allow more rapid response to changes in public health. There are, of course, lessons learned that have helped the next generation of tools to be thought about based on needs. For one, it is clear that spatiotemporal modeling and analysis will be critical to the healthcare system, allowing real-time tracking of infections and forecasting. A second need is also to allow systems to be interactive and enable data sharing. This may require healthcare facilities to use cloud-based GIS systems, rather than only tools made specifically for their institutions, as the sharing of data that allows real-time interaction to occur is critical to enable healthcare workers to better plan across multiple regions and coordinate activities. Tools that apply GIS-based Multicriteria Evaluation (GME), as an example, is a likely direction for platform application to address this need.[3] In India, researchers have called for the healthcare system there to develop a national GIS database for health data, which is particularly important during a pandemic when national-level coordination is so critical to limit the spread of infections.[4] Using GIS for healthcare takes us back to the origins of spatial analysis, such as John Snow’s famous use of spatial mapping and analysis in 1854 to map the source of cholera in London’s urban water infrastructure. Researchers have also called for particular focus by the GIS and healthcare communities to create coordinated GIS databases that are not only relevant for one country but multiple countries in particularly vulnerable regions such as sub-Sahara Africa. Researchers have taken a first step in assembling data for healthcare facilities across sub-Sahara Africa, but efforts will need to go much further so that real-time data sharing and monitoring are even possible.[5] GIS will certainly be critical to healthcare in the future. The question is how do countries and regions begin to develop systems that can better prepare us not only for the next pandemic but also for other public health events or crises. Some regions and countries, such as in the UK, have made good efforts towards this through a developed GIS system at a national level, but other countries and regions, such as India and in sub-Sahara Africa, far more effort is needed. What is clear is coordination, data sharing, and real-time data provisioning and forecasting will be critical for health professionals to better deal with major crises. source: https://www.gislounge.com/gis-and-the-future-of-public-health/
  10. 1 point
    A new set of 10 ArcGIS Pro lessons empowers GIS practitioners, instructors, and students with essential skills to find, acquire, format, and analyze public domain spatial data to make decisions. Described in this video, this set was created for 3 reasons: (1) to provide a set of analytical lessons that can be immediately used, (2) to update the original 10 lessons created by my colleague Jill Clark and I to provide a practical component to our Esri Press book The GIS Guide to Public Domain Data, and (3) to demonstrate how ArcGIS Desktop (ArcMap) lessons can be converted to Pro and to reflect upon that process. The activities can be found here. This essay is mirrored on the Esri GeoNet education blog and the reflections are below and in this video. Summary of Lessons: Can be used in full, in part, or modified to suit your own needs. 10 lessons. 64 work packages. A “work package” is a set of tasks focused on solving a specific problem. 370 guided steps. 29 to 42 hours of hands-on immersion. Over 600 pages of content. 100 skills are fostered, covering GIS tools and methods, working with data, and communication. 40 data sources are used, covering 85 different data layers. Themes covered: climate, business, population, fire, floods, hurricanes, land use, sustainability, ecotourism, invasive species, oil spills, volcanoes, earthquakes, agriculture. Areas covered: The Globe, and also: Brazil, New Zealand, the Great Lakes of the USA, Canada, the Gulf of Mexico, Iceland, the Caribbean Sea, Kenya, Orange County California, Nebraska, Colorado, and Texas USA. Aimed at university-level graduate and university or community college undergraduate student. Some GIS experience is very helpful, though not absolutely required. Still, my advice is not to use these lessons for students’ first exposure to GIS, but rather, in an intermediate or advanced setting. How to access the lessons: The ideal way to work through the lessons is in a Learn Path which bundle the readings of the book’s chapters, selected blog essays, and the hands-on activities.. The Learn Path is split into 3 parts, as follows: Solving Problems with GIS and public domain geospatial data 1 of 3: Learn how to find, evaluate, and analyze data to solve location-based problems through this set of 10 chapters and short essay readings, and 10 hands-on lessons: https://learn.arcgis.com/en/paths/the-gis-guide-to-public-domain-data-learn-path/ Solving Problems with GIS and public domain geospatial data 2 of 3: https://learn.arcgis.com/en/paths/the-gis-guide-to-public-domain-data-learn-path-2/ Solving Problems with GIS and public domain geospatial data 3 of 3: https://learn.arcgis.com/en/paths/the-gis-guide-to-public-domain-data-learn-path-3/ The Learn Paths allow for content to be worked through in sequence, as shown below: You can also access the lessons by accessing this gallery in ArcGIS Online, shown below. If you would like to modify the lessons for your own use, feel free! This is why the lessons have been provided in a zipped bundle as PDF files here and as MS Word DOCX files here. This video provides an overview. source: https://spatialreserves.wordpress.com/2020/05/14/10-new-arcgis-pro-lesson-activities-learn-paths-and-migration-reflections/
  11. 1 point
    Hi Everyone, July 13–16, 2020 | The world’s largest, virtual GIS event (FREE this year) The 2020 Esri User Conference (Esri UC) is a completely virtual event designed to give users and students an interactive, online experience with Esri and the GIS community. Participate in sessions and view presentations that offer geospatial solutions, browse the online Map Gallery, watch the Plenary Session, and much more. Registration here : https://www.esri.com/en-us/about/events/uc/overview Enjoy
  12. 1 point
    the satellites from planet can now take imagery at 50cm, they changed their orbit in order to achieve better GSD SKYSAT IMAGERY NOW AVAILABLE Bring agility to your organization with the latest advancements in high-resolution SkySat imagery, available today. Make targeted decisions in ever-changing operational contexts with improved 50 cm spatial resolution and more transparency in the ordering process with the new Tasking Dashboard.
  13. 1 point
    Dapat data shp untuk peta multirawan se Indonesia. silahkan dicek https://drive.google.com/file/d/1anG5xcA9uMo1P9jLeppBvEXpaExJsLhk/view untested, lupa dapet darimana link ini


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