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  1. It depends on whether or not your job market requires it. I'm in Canada and its relatively a non-issue if you have already proven track record. I don't recommend taking it in Canada unless you have extra money to burn. I have seen no benefit to the professional accreditation I received from ESRI in the job market here. The other issue is that if a company is asking for that accredation, usually they want it up-to-date. That means you will have to keep retaking it with every major new release (as the exams are tied to major releases). At the end of the day, your proven skills and who you know are much more relevant than a paid accreditation. I mean, I guess if all things are equal between candidates at the end of the day, it might get you the job. As far as exam preparation goes, I believe there used to be some old course materials on this website at one point. You can do a search for that. Other than that, look at sample questions and take the free course here: https://www.esri.com/training/catalog/57630431851d31e02a43ee38/esri-technical-certification:-sample-questions-for-arcgis-desktop-associate/ It will give you an indication on how questions will be asked and what to expect. Be aware that the professional exam is much more technically inclined and specific. I've taken that particular exam and there are some tricky questions. Personally, I don't think its worth the money and isn't an industry standard here.
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  2. yes it is possible, as long as There is a proper overlap (approximately 80% frontal overlap and 60% side overlap). It is possible to describe the camera in terms of position (latitude/longitude/altitude) and parameters (sensor size, pixel resolution, focal length). The position mentioned in this prequisities cant be interpreted as georeference information, but the sensor position, which is usually stored in the imagery metadata
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  3. It might be useful!! http://environgeomatics.blogspot.in/2016/01/how-to-add-google-maps-into-arcmap.html How to add google maps into ArcMap Although ArcGIS allows to bring the Bing maps and Esri images as base layers in ArcMap, still sometimes we rely on google images because of their better accuracy and their frequent update. Some of us using openlayers plugin in QGIS to access the google maps as a base map. This tutorial shows you to how quickly you can add the google maps, google hybrid images and open street maps etc. to the ArcMap for testing purposes. Portable basemap server PBS is an open source WPF application which can be used to access the WMTS basemap service inside ArcGIS. Steps 1. Download and unzip the file in the desired location of your PC.(download link). 2.Open the Portable Basemap Server folder and right click thePortableBasemapServer.exe 3.Select the GoogleMapsImagery or desired one in the Data Source Type drop down menu. 4. Then click the Start New Service button. 5.Copy the OGC WMTS URL by clicking the Copy to Clipboard. Don't stop the PBSapplication, just minimize that. 6. Next open the Arcmap. 7.Open the Catalog and then click the Add WMTS server in GIS Servers. 8.Paste the Copied URL here in URL text box. Click Get Layers and click OK. 9.Next, right click the added WMTS Server and click the connect option. 10.Now it’s time to import the base map layer. You can drag down theGoogleMapsImagery from the Catalog to ArcMap Data View or you can simply add through the Add Data option.
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  4. the best bet if you find free data programs, you submit a research and get the data, I saw once Tandem-X offer this programs. for now, a completely free DEM data stuck in 30 m resolution, anyone have another update maybe? hey tandem-x have a general proposal programs, maybe you can try it : https://tandemx-science.dlr.de/ scroll down
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  5. on the content type , you can choose topic for permanent result, I think you should make your own stream, click activity - my activity stream and create new stream
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  6. Thanks Lurker!. I don'y want to sound unpoilte. Sorry if my english limited me in that way pasfan01. The key is that the soft, it's an implementation of some tehoretical algorithm. Sometimes, we coud use or adapt that algorithm for a different prupose, but sometimes... is usefull. Knowing the photogrammetric tehory, I advise that using Agisodt for pushbroom (or barridors like Landsat TM and ETM) CAN'T perform fine. Usually in remote sensig DTM there is not not an inmediate risk for the user, But this sound to me like some one using an enginieering software designed for bridges structural analysys, trying to calculate the dome of a stadium, What I mean with "Can' perform fine"?? I state that the deliverable that you can obtain with cartosat-1 and Agisoft, will be less accurate that any ASTER DTM, OR SRTM (Ok SRTM data was taled in 2000, but Aster is still operative) I'd out of spatial imgining for a couple of years, so I don't know what images are available today. Art PS: If any one want an explanation about why the movement of the camera (180km) is relevant, I can explain that
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  7. Best design and aesthetic view to the forum lovin it..
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  8. i like this discussion, keep it up we need more like this, BTW, I think the best approach is keep the theory as the corridor to discover a new things try something new is good but there is a limitation based on theory, so let discuss how far that limit carry on
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  9. LOL. Here goes one example of "theoretical stuffs". Why don't try to build a satellite instrument to see earth surface freflectance in ultraviolet o shoter wavelegnghs? Answer: it''s IMPOSSIBLE to see that from space due atmospheric absortion!!! What you call "theoretical stuffs" is the cause that we need the soft. "Discover" dosen't mean "ignore" knowledge. Belive me, maybe the soft allow you to get some result. But these result is a useless. I hope your doctor don't sahre your point o view!
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  10. you can experience the online demo of SuperMap iServer: http://www.supermap.com/en/html/SuperMap_GIS_OnlineDemo.html
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  11. If you want to do it the conversion to GEOTIFF/IMG format in quick and easy way, the IMPACT Toolbox may be could help you, It is also possible that the toolbox could preserve some important imagery metadata stored in the XML file of original data (which is only can be accessed thoroughly using SNAP) in the conversion process. Here is the link http://forobs.jrc.ec.europa.eu/products/software/
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  12. The groundbreaking Landsat partnership between NASA and the United States Geological Survey (USGS) is set to continue into the future as a new bill ensures ongoing funding for the program. This funding will treat the program as an ongoing entity, rather then the previous model of treating each satellite as a one-off launch. This will ensure continuity of data in the project that has been imaging the Earth’s surface for close to 50 years. This represents a strategic shift to a sustainable land imaging system, with the budget proposal including multi-decadal multi-mission funding to ensure integrity of the program. Benefits of Landsat ImageryThe project has proved a boon to many industries and fields of research. Landsat has amassed a catalog of multi-spectral moderate resolution imagery of the world’s landmasses over half a century, which can be used to track many terrestrial processes. Sarah Ryker, USGS deputy associate director for climate and land use elaborated, “The White House found that GPS, Weather, and Landsat are the three most critical Earth-orbiting assets for civil applications, as they are used in a wide range of sectors and fields of research. Landsat 9 and the long-term commitment to the program is great for natural resource and science and data-driven industries.” The Landsat Program ContinuesThe budget proposal calls on NASA and the USGS to immediately begin development of two satellites to take over from Landsat 8 at the end of its mission. John Grunsfeld, associate administrator for science at NASA headquarters explains “Moving out on Landsat 9 is a high priority for NASA and USGS as part of a sustainable land imaging program that will serve the nation into the future as the current Landsat program has done for decades. Continuing the critical observations made by the Landsat satellites is important now and their value will only grow in the future, given the long term environmental changes we are seeing on planet Earth.” The first of these will launch in 2019 in a ‘stop-gap’ mission to take over from a faulty thermal infra-red sensor on Landsat 8. This craft will be a polar-orbiting ‘free flyer’ that will fly in formation with Landsat 8 to bridge the gap in thermal imaging. The second will be the Landsat 9 satellite, that will essentially replicate the functions of Landsat 8, with a more resilient thermal infra-red sensor that is designed to last for five years, the same lifespan as the satellite. The thermal infra-red sensor on Landsat 8 was only designed to last for three years, while the satellite’s lifespan was 5. This has led to the capability gap needing to be bridged with a free-flying replacement satellite. Landsat 9 project scientist Jeffrey Mosek summarizes the launch “The 2023 launch will propel the program past 50 years of collecting global land cover data. The hallmark of Landsat- the longer the satellites view Earth, the more phenomena you observe and understand; changes in irrigation, conversion of forest to pasture, activities where human pressures or natural environmental pressures are causing shifts in land use over decades.” (The anticipated launch date has since been updated to 2020. See the info page for Landsat 9) Congress has asked NASA to design, build, and launch Landsat 9 for less then $650 million, significantly less then the $855 million price tag for Landsat 8. The replication of many systems and sensors across the two launches should ensure redundancy of effort and a less expensive build. NASA has also been authorized to study upgraded and miniaturized systems that could be included in Landsat 10 in 2030, with a design decision due in 2019. The continuation of the Landsat program will enable NASA to continue it’s mission to help the world observe, understand, and manage natural systems by archiving long-term records of the Earth’s surface. source : https://www.gislounge.com/landsat-9-will-launch-2020/
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  13. Download the latest SuperMap GIS products (with 3 month trial) http://www.supermap.com/en/html/SuperMap_GIS_ProductPackages.html Also you can check the tutorials of iDesktop 8C: http://www.supermap.com/en/html/SuperMap_GIS_OnlineVideo.html
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  14. Hello, The "Recent Topics" link that used to be on the top right corner of the screen is missing in the new look of the forum. This is really a very good and useful link and I hate not seeing it anymore
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  15. on the top menu click Activity - Unread Contents or you can make your own customize by clicking Activity - My Activity Streams - Create New Stream
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  16. The same impression here. I believe admins will put it back after this IPB upgrade. BTW, you can use "All Activity".
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  18. This is a very very broad question. It really depends on what you will be using it for. When starting out I start out with only 2 major questions: 1) What functionality do I need? Less is more. Too many web mapping apps are loaded with almost too much functionality. It's a challenge making something that is robust functionally and intuitive to use at the same time. Many of the templates you will use will only have 50% of what you will actually need and the other 50% will be things you don't need/want. This includes security. This also includes determining whether or not users will connect through a mobile device to your app as well as a PC (this changes a lot of things). Things like User vs. Administrator functionality need to be considered, target audience, large-scale multi-user editing requiring enterprise dbms, etc... Open source vs. properietary? 2) What back-end will I use to store and manage the data and what front-end will you use to deliver the data (i.e. Silverlight, HTML5, etc...) They each have their advantages and disadvantages and is usually determined by the functionality I need. There are still reasons to use Silverlight in some rare cases. They are tools to do the job, just like a hammer or wrench. I've seen some terrific Silverlight webGIS (our main company editor is still utilizing Silverlight due to the fact it can still do somethings our staff rely on, that something like HTML5 cannot). On the reverse, I've seen some terrible HTML5 webGIS applications as well. Although I do strongly urge most people to stay away from Silverlight due to the obvious fact that its not supported by a lot of new browsers as well as UI issues it tends to have. There are no real "best practices" for what to put on a user's site because it's dependent directly on what the user will be doing with it. For example at our office, we like everything minimalist and this means no scale bars, scale text, etc... on the map (these only show up if the user wants them to from the toolbar or in a print layout). Our staff want maximum imagery and no "filler". We use regional and local projections (i.e. MTM or UTM zones) and not generic Mercator projections as we need good measurements with little distortion. We do NOT like to use cloud storage (this is different obviously for other businesses). We put lots of effort into creating good printing templates for reports (this is something that is really really neglected I find on web GIS apps). I mean I guess you could say north arrow, scalebar, print, export, legend etc... but those aren't really best practices that are related to WebGIS as they apply to all cartographic products. Things like heat maps, cluster mapping etc are often used incorrectly. In order to use this type of mapping you really need a nice amount of representative data. Having a heat map generated from say 20 points over a large national area is relatively useless. I don't recommend these things unless your data is good enough to support it. Web GIS applications are often created with what looks like the intended purpose of fully replacing a desktop environment and I strongly think this is a recipe for disaster because its impossible to do that. I see a lot of Geocortex solutions do this and a lot of it is just screen "bloatware" (its a great product in the right circumstances though). Consider these adjectives: - intuitive - responsive - quick - easy - simple - comprehensible - stream-lined If your application can meet most of these, then you are on your way. Of course, the application is only 1/2 of the package. The data is the other 1/2. If the data isn't properly prepped, etc for use on the web or in your application then your awesome application will run slower as it struggles with the loading of the data. When you say it is for commercial use, do you mean you will be using it to sell products on it commercially (i.e. such as an air photo library), or do you mean it will be used by "Company X" as a generic viewer for their staff at work?
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  19. Where do you have ERDAS 2016 ? Share a download link, please.
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  20. cool waiting for New Version of GISAREA forum, regards
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  21. Great ! Looking forward to see changes and functionalities. darksabersan.
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  22. nice , waiting for the new version,
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  23. After internally using it for two years, Google has announced the open-source release of its thematic mapping library Cartographer. The tool is designed to enable real-time simultaneous localization and mapping, better known by its acronym SLAM, and has the capability to build a 2D or 3D map while keeping track of an individual or robotic agent’s location on that map. SLAM algorithms combine data from various sensors – for instance Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) systems and cameras — to simultaneously find the location of the sensor and a map of the sensor’s surroundings. The technology works with the open source Robot Operating System (ROS), thus enabling easy-to-deploy software in robots, self-driving cars, and drones. Cartographer builds globally consistent maps in real-time across a broad range of sensor configurations common in academia and industry. The following video is a demonstration of Cartographer’s real-time loop closure: github repo : https://github.com/googlecartographer/cartographer source : https://opensource.googleblog.com/2016/10/introducing-cartographer.html
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  24. Hi Garmin NT Maps can not be converted into a shapefile, there is no software till date that can do this. Non NT old Garmin maps can be converted by first unlocking the map and the by using GPS Mapedit to same in Polish Format. After that you can convert into Shapefile using registered version of GPS Mapedit. Stuart
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  25. why you want to process remote sensing image with UAV software? UAV software lack function for remote sensing data, I dont think you can make precision DEM from it better process it with ERDAS or ENVI software. and yes with stereo pair image you can make DEM from it here : https://www.researchgate.net/post/How_do_you_generate_DEM_from_Cartosat-1_STEREO_data
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